The beauty of Australia is in its diversity. This is very well illustrated in the different types of road that you’re likely to encounter when you go on a long-distance trip. You may start off on smooth, shiny asphalt, but you don’t have to venture too far before “getting onto the loose.” Your vehicle needs to be able to adapt in these situations, especially when it comes to its ride, and you need to know what type of shock absorber is best for you if you like taking a trip to the wild side occasionally.

How Shock Absorbers Work

Shock absorbers are the most critical elements of a suspension system, and these hydraulic dampers have a big role to play in smoothing out your ride. These units absorb energy whenever a certain load is placed on the vehicle’s springs. The job of the shock absorber is to resist the energy in that sudden movement. Without the shock absorber, the vehicle would simply continue to bounce up and down until the energy was eventually dissipated.

Why Average May Be No Good

One of the problems with a standard shock absorber is the fact that it is only designed for a “typical” type of action. Within the absorber is a piston contained in a tube filled with oil. When the suspension is activated, the oil will be forced into the piston through a small hole and the movement will be based on the size of the hole itself. In other words, if the hole is bigger, the action of the shock absorber will be more limited and vice versa.

About the Adjustable Shock

While this may be fine for conventional driving, it’s not as good when it comes to unpredictable surfaces. This is why adjustable shocks were invented. These have two independent knobs that allow you to independently set the amount of rebound in those pistons as well as the level of compression. Now, it is possible to set different performance rates for each shock absorber on each corner of the car, and you can do this independently or selectively. These “double-adjustable” shock absorbers offer you a level of flexibility that’s more difficult to achieve with the conventional, stiffer shock absorbers or by trying to adjust your vehicle’s spring rates.

This means that you can set your adjustable shocks at one level for your “normal” driving in the city, but then you can change them according to your specification before you head into the outback at the weekend.